Birth Boot Camp® Natural Childbirth Education Classes – Online and Instructor-

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Labor and Birth

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4 Reasons You Should Travel For Doula Training

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Have you checked out Birth Boot Camp DOULA? You probably noticed some big, exciting differences between our training and other trainings out there These differences are well thought out, purposeful and based on the experience and expertise of the birth professionals who created this professional doula certification program.

One of the things that sets Birth Boot Camp DOULA apart is that we host training in one location and you come to us! Yes, you heard that right, (currently) we train only in the Dallas/Fort Worth area and unless you live there, you will need to travel to attend our training.

Why on earth should you travel when there are doula trainings all over the country put on by organizations who will come to your doorstep? Like the rest of our program, this is intentional and we want to share with you some of the reasoning behind our decision to train in this very specific manner.

1. Birth Boot Camp DOULA training is uniform

What this means is that ALL of our doulas have the same training experience. They are trained by the same two women (Amanda Devereaux and Maria Pokluda). They all learn the same techniques, business skills, professional practices and standards, ethical considerations and much more. This is nothing short of groundbreaking.

How many organizations have dozens of trainers? While the trainees get the same certification, they are not all equally trained. Variation can be great depending on who leads the training. This just simply isn’t acceptable for us. So, in order to have a consistent training and consistently trained doulas, we have set up our training in this manner.

2. Birth Boot Camp DOULA training prepares you for a sustainable doula career, not just a doula hobby

The word ‘doula’ is one that is still foreign to many people in our culture. Often the first people ever hear of a doula is when they are pregnant and start looking around for birth support. Because even the idea of a doula is fairly new in our country, it is no wonder that the work of doula as a professional career is just gaining traction.

For most birth workers, the passion for birth must be equally yoked with a need for sustainability. Working as a free or low cost doula isn’t sustainable due the very real cost and time necessitated in this amazing, but often difficult, work.

We want doulas to be financially successful because we know this is needed to maintain joy in their profession and enables them to benefit from their work rather than just sacrifice. We believe that doulas who know how to run a business are better doulas and will have a long, satisfying doula career that is both emotionally and monetarily rewarding.

3. We can charge you less if you come to us

Birth Boot Camp DOULA (and childbirth education) organize training differently than any other doula training company out there. We believe there is a lot of value in working as a team. Your training involves many people, not just one. This has benefits including different teaching techniques, personalities, areas of expertise (including lactation, marketing and business support) and experience that are brought to the table from a variety of people who comprise the Birth Boot Camp team. We know from practice that this makes our training both comprehensive and unique.

We also know from experience that it is very expensive to travel with our large education team. We are not willing to sacrifice the quality of your training simply so we can pump out more doulas. We want our doulas to be the best, and after much thought and work we have decided that this is the best way to help build and support them.  We value quality over quantity. After all, when you are empowered, knowledgeable and supported to have a sustainable practice you will have a greater impact in your community. More doulas don’t make as much of a positive difference as better doulas.

4. Community, community, community

Birth Boot Camp DOULA is part of a larger community that includes (currently) over 100 Birth Boot Camp childbirth educators and our growing family of doulas. As a company we strive to keep our people connected to one another.

This begins at training. As mentioned, you will attend a live training with the same trainers as every other Birth Boot Camp DOULA. Even the doulas you didn’t train with will share your experience and connection.

After training you will be added to the private Birth Boot Camp DOULA facebook group where all of our doulas can communicate and learn with one another as well as have a safe and supportive place to process the sometimes difficult job of a doula. The community of doulas continues on in our unique mentor program. You should never feel alone as a Birth Boot Camp DOULA.

Doula work is precious but not always easy. The value of community with your common trainers (who you will have continual access to) and fellow doulas is immeasurable. This will help you be successful and happy in this amazing career.

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Your training comprises so much. This includes: marketing instruction, Q&A, hands on techniques, business information, a breastfeeding course and breastfeeding training specific for doulas from an IBCLC, and access to the full 10 week Birth Boot Camp online childbirth classes. This means you don’t have to pay for another childbirth class, another lactation training, or struggle wondering how to market your small business. These are things we think every doula should have knowledge of when she leaves training, and we make sure it happens.

Feel free to contact us if you have any more questions about Birth Boot Camp DOULA!

Meet our amazing doula trainers, Maria and Amanda. They are incredible.

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What Your Doctor Wants To Tell You About Birth, But Can’t

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Too often, medical doctors are portrayed as the bad guys in the birthing world. In truth, there is a lot we don’t see and which they really can’t talk about. We are excited to share this guest post today from Jessicca Moore, a family nurse practitioner and filmmaker in Petaluma, CA. Jessica is currently raising money to help finish a film all about medical personnel who birth at home. (There are more of them than you would think!) You can read more about her film, “Why Not Home?“, on their website. Her words are wise and incredibly helpful. Happy birthing!

If you’re planning a hospital birth in the US, you’re likely seeing an OB/GYN. Some of you are seeing a family doctor or a certified-nurse-midwife (CNM) who will attend you at the hospital.

Doctors and nurses are trained not to impose their own values and beliefs onto their patients. To the woman who says she doesn’t want to feel any pain during labor and wants an epidural as soon as possible, our training tells us to accept this as her choice and support her in it. To the woman who says she wants an unmedicated natural labor, our training tells us to accept and support this choice as equally valid.

Your provider is supposed to maintain some professional distance and remain unbiased toward her patients. Because of this, she likely won’t tell you about how difficult her recovery from her c-section was and how she couldn’t pick up her toddler for weeks.

She won’t tell you about the intense rush of emotion and joy that came over her when she gave birth to her daughter after a long 30 hour unmedicated vaginal birth. If she did, you might feel like you should do it the way she did, or do it differently, depending on her story.

In your 10-15 minute visits, it can be hard to delve deeply into all the possible risks and benefits of each decision, the research, and your personal values and preferences. Even if you did, the chances that that provider is going to be the one attending your birth are pretty slim.

So much of birth is out of your control. Once you’re in labor, things can go any number of ways.

If you want to have a natural birth, here are some things you can do to stack the deck in your favor.

  • Get prepared. There are lots of great childbirth preparation programs out there. Try a few and see what fits. Knowledge is power when it comes to birth.

  • Read birth stories. Positive ones. Listen to your friends who had great births. Focus on those. Your birth can be great too.

  • Get support. Hire a doula. Don’t think you can afford one? Call and talk to a few. You may be surprised. If you can’t get a doula, ask friend who has experienced birth and knows your plan to be there to support and advocate for you. Your partner will be having their own experience. Don’t rely on them to be everything for you.

  • Get informed. What is your hospital’s c-section rate? Trying for a VBAC? What’s the VBAC success rate at your hospital? Birth by the Numbers has a great site for getting this information. www.birthbythenumbers.org

  • Ask questions. Especially if something doesn’t feel quite right. Is the induction necessary? What if we wait 2 more days? It’s your body and your baby. You’re allowed to ask questions.

  • Take care. Rest. Eat well. Stay active. Try prenatal yoga. You’ll be that much better off entering labor if your body is strong and healthy.

Do all that, and then let go. Birth is big. Birth is beautiful. There’s no one right way to do it.

You are powerful. You are capable. You can do it.

If and when you need help, it will be there for you.

No one can tell you how it will go for you.

You and your baby are starting your journey together. You’ll have your own unique experience.

Your doctor may have seen hundreds or thousands of births, but they’ve never seen yours.

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Jessicca Moore is a family nurse practitioner and filmmaker in Petaluma, CA where she lives with her husband, two children, and two sheep. She is currently in production on her first feature-length documentary, “Why Not Home?” The film follows hospital birth providers who chose to give birth at home. You can watch a trailer and get more information here: www.whynothome.com and support the project on kickstarter at bit.ly/whynothome through October 10th.

Follow the project on twitter and instagram @whynothome and facebook at facebook.com/whynothome

You can find Jessicca on twitter @jessicca_moore

(Photos by Erin Wrightsman, used with permission.)

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21 Things Women Are Really Thinking In Labor

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Labor. The BIG day. Birth.

What is a partner to do?! How do you remember it all? How can you make it through with all well and a mama who still loves you?

Here are some fabulous tips from moms who KNOW what a woman in labor needs from her partner. Compiled from our expert birth instructors (who have each had a natural birth themselves) these ideas can help both of you come out better on the other side of your birth.

1. ”Don’t take it personal if I don’t want to be touched or talked to or tell you to be quiet.”

Some women just labor best when left alone. (But don’t plan on this because you never know!)

2. ”Be an active participant.”

Interact, massage, encourage, etc. Get involved. (This sounds contradictory to the last one, doesn’t it?! The truth is, different women want different things and you need to be prepared for ALL possibilities. Don’t assume she will be one way or the other because you really don’t know until you are in it! Your birth class should prepare you for all possibilities.)

3. ”Let me do what works for me!”

If mom wants to play on her phone and it helps her, don’t take it away! There isn’t really a “right” way to cope in labor, as long as mom is happy.

4. ”Don’t leave!”

Stay there–your presence is important.

5. ”For the love of all that is holy, don’t forget your Altoids!”

Breath mints. Do we really have to explain this one? Coffee breath, garlic bread from the night before, that tuna salad you had at lunch, for goodness sakes, brush your teeth or eat a mint!

6. ”PAY FOR A DOULA!”

It is worth it for you AND her.

7. ”When mom asks for something in labor it’s because she NEEDS it (it’s not a want).”

Women in labor have needs. NEEDS!

8. “The relaxation exercises will help dad stay calm in labor so he should practice too.”

You will get lots of relaxation exercises with your birth class. Use them, practice them, get comfortable with them.

9. ”It’s okay to be nervous – most dads are – take a birth class to ease fears!”

10. ”My husband couldn’t think of things to say when I needed him to give me encouragement. He said he hadn’t had his coffee yet. Good thing the baby was born a few minutes later because he was about to get fired! So a list of good things to say to mom if she wants or needs encouragement is really helpful.”

You will talk about this in your birth class, so go home and write them down in the appropriate spot in your workbook! Review them. Then review them AGAIN.

11. ”I will feed off of your energy, so please be confident in me. (My husband was awesome at this!!)”

Sometimes the biggest help is just believing that she can do it when she doesn’t even believe it herself.

12. ”Be completely present with me.“

We make kids put away their distractions at school; possibly the same rule is appropriate for birth! The phone, the work, ESPN, whatever it is that distracts you- it can wait.

13. ”Maybe watching a movie or ballgame during labor will be totally not worth it later and she may never forgive you!”

TRUE STORY.

14. ”Please cry with me when the baby is born. Because I will. And because if you can’t, you’re dead inside.”

(OK- not everybody is emotional or a crier – not even mom. That is fine and understandable. But it is also true that there is nothing wrong with a man being deeply touched and showing it after the birth of his child.)

15. ” Know how to set up and take down the birth pool…before I’m in labor!“

Nothing quite like yelling instructions in between contractions…

16. ”A doula will enhance Dad’s role and at the same time take a lot of stress off him.”

A great doula doesn’t steal the show- she supports everybody there.

17. ”The most important thing (at least for me during my births) was simply his presence and holding his hand. I think sometimes dads feel too much pressure to do stuff beyond their scope…”

Have we mentioned doulas yet?!

18. ”I think for me, at our home birth, it was just like ‘Babe, take beautiful pictures of this amazing experience. Capture the essence of this!’

They’re all blurry.”

(Maybe this tip should be, “Spring for a photographer!”???)

19. ” I always think it’s powerful when dad gives mom a gift after the birth. I am not a gifty person at all, so I don’t know why I feel this way, but after birth for dad to give something special to mom to acknowledge how much she went through to carry and birth their child is really touching. Especially something she can keep forever that has personal significance. Especially for dads that find it hard to be involved in birth in an intimate way or say emotionally intimate things in general. He can just hand it to her and say “Thank you.””

Who wouldn’t love a little bobble for their wrist?

20. ”My husband makes a cheese cake for us to eat after each baby is born. It’s a tradition started by his father. This last time we used our own farm eggs and local blueberries for the topping.“

Awwwww!….Love is a timeless tradition!

21. ”Speak up! We created a birth plan together so remind me of my goals and encourage me to follow through with them, even if I look exhausted or defeated.”

After all the hours of preparation, talking, classes, planning and hard work, don’t let it all fly out the window in labor because you got nervous. You’ve got this! Sometimes a smile and a whispered compliment is just the thing she needs.

We can’t really tell you what your partner will be thinking in labor, but we can tell you one thing for sure–this day matters and you are one of the most important parts of it.

We hope that all women and their partners have an AMAZING birth! The work you put into it beforehand will ultimately pay off because then you WILL know what she is thinking and respond appropriately.

Here’s to a wonderful birth!

Looking for some great books for the partner to read to prepare for your upcoming birth? Here are a few fabulous ideas, in addition to your Field Manual:

The Birth Book by Dr Sears: This book is a classic with helpful hints that anybody can appreciate. With the perspective of both mom and dad thrown in but from one of America’s most trusted physicians, The Birth Book is a must-read and as invaluable as it is readable.

The Birth Partner by Penny Simkin: This book is specifically geared for the partner and has a wonderful quick reference section with helpful, illustrated birth positions and much, much more. This is one to pack in your birth bag.

Mind Over Labor by Carl Jones is a short book but packed with information. This book will change the way you view birth!

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From Epidurals To Home Birth- Meet Instructor Hailie in Abilene, TX

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Birth class couples after playing a game to learn how epidurals work in Hailie’s birth class!

We are excited to share with you a series of articles highlighting our diverse group of birth instructors. These are the amazing women who are doing real work trying to make birth better for women and their families all over the world. Today we introduce Hailie Wolfe, a birth teacher in Abilene, TX, mother of five (and kinda famous You-Tuber) who has birthed in so many different ways. In fact, one of her birth videos is featured in our classes! We love Hailie and we are sure you will too. Thanks and enjoy!

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First, could you introduce yourself? Tell us a little bit about your own birth experiences and how they influenced your desire to teach birth classes.

My name is Hailie Wolfe and I own Country Bumpkin Birth Services in Abilene, TX. I have five children – four of them were born in the hospital; three of which were medicated and one was unmedicated.

My medicated births were very standard hospital births. There were several things that I didn’t like about those experiences, but it was years before I realized that how I was made to feel for those births really DID matter. I had some wonderful nurses, but oddly enough, the one I remember most was the one who treated me terribly and that makes me sad. I was given routine episiotomies. I was given the highest pitocin drip on more than one occasion. I thought all of this was “normal”.

When I became pregnant with my 4th child, I decided I wanted to do things differently. At the time, we planned for #4 to be our last baby and I didn’t want to miss out on the opportunity to experience birthing naturally. I came to view it almost as a rite of passage I had missed out on because of my ignorance during my previous pregnancies. When I gave birth naturally, I finally understood WHY it was so important. I had an easy postpartum recovery for the very first time. I was on a birth high for days and felt very empowered.

I enjoyed birth so much that it influenced our decision to add another baby to the family. My fifth child, a surprise breech birth, was born at home in my bath tub. You can watch her birth video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFabMR4sg5g

I was able to have a natural birth with self education, but the whole time I was pregnant with my 4th child I wished there was an accessible class where I could get the information in one place. That inspired me to become a Birth Boot Camp instructor. I wanted women in my community to have easy access to this important information. 

What first got you interested in the realm of birth?

Looking back, I always have had an interest in birth itself. I remember as a teenager being really into watching shows about birth on the Discovery Channel and being disappointed when they didn’t actually show the baby come out. When we had to watch The Miracle of Life in high school health class, I was secretly excited to see what it would look like for a baby to come out.

I’d like to say that I was so inspired by birth that I went into the medical field after high school, but that would be a lie. I didn’t want to go to nursing school because I didn’t want to wipe butts or clean up puke – no gross stuff for me. I don’t know why I didn’t realize that was in the job description for motherhood, because I signed up for that without concern! I became an elementary teacher where I wiped noses and pulled teeth. What can I say? I have a mothers’ stomach.

The point that REALLY got me interested in pursuing birth work was when I went through a very painful induction with my third child and had a terrible recovery. When I decided to go natural with my fourth and I had such a wonderful experience – that was when I really discovered my passion sharing birth with others.

What are your particular passions concerning birth?

Over the last few months, I’m becoming increasingly interested in reaching disengaged dads. I hear birth workers constantly blast dads for thinking birth classes, doulas, etc. are a waste of money. It hits home for me because my husband was one of those dads. He pretty much agreed to hire a doula just to make me happy – but then seeing was believing for him. He was amazed at how much better the experience was when we birthed with a doula. I want to figure out how to reach the skeptical dads like my husband, and I want to reach them before their wives are insisting on having a doula because they’ve been through a bad experience. I’m preparing to host a Doula Dad night soon so that my husband can speak to other dads about the benefits of having a doula. I’m hopeful that hearing another dad’s perspective will encourage others to be more open about birth preparation.

There are lots of different birth educator training programs out there. Why did you choose Birth Boot Camp?

I actually have a dear friend, Megan Martin, who teaches classes in Burleson, TX. When I voiced my interest in Birth Boot Camp she really encouraged me to go for it. I didn’t even do very much research on other programs. The organization is very transparent about their beliefs, which perfectly align with my own birth philosophy. It is clear, concise, and complete, and those are attributes that will truly prepare couples for birth. I knew early on that it was the right program for me to teach

Tell us a little about your Birth Boot Camp training experience. Where did you train? What did you like about it?

I attended Birth Boot Camp instructor training in July 2013 in Grapevine, Texas. I really enjoyed getting to meet and gain knowledge from other woman across the country who share the same passion as me. I love my children with my whole heart, but it was refreshing to stimulate my brain for a few days alongside a great group of ladies.

During my hotel stay for the training, I was roomates with Lauren McClain, creator of MyBreechBaby.org. She taught me so much about breech birth during break times and when we’d stay up late chatting. I remember thinking how great it was that I was learning all this new breech information in preparation for teaching other moms. I never would have dreamed that I would personally be putting all that information to use when I delivered my own surprise breechling just three weeks later. I will never forget Lauren.

How is teaching your own classes going for you? What do you enjoy most about it? 

Each series I’ve taught has gone great! The part I enjoy most is getting to connect with couples and share information that I wish I had known earlier in my birthing years. It makes me feel like I am making a difference. It is also incredibly enjoyable to see dads gradually become more and more engaged in birth preparations. Over the 10 weeks it gets very “real” for them. It’s a neat process to watch.

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Hailie with her youngest baby, born at home.

In what ways did the Birth Boot Camp teacher training help prepare you for teaching actual classes?

I was really nervous at instructor training when we had to individually teach a specific topic. It was reminiscent of my elementary teaching days when the principal would come in for observations; judgement from colleagues can be intimidating. BUT, it was completely judgement free with lots of constructive feedback and I even learned new information from some of the other trainees during their presentations.

I also really liked that we practiced relaxation exercises and labor positions in groups. You’d be surprised how difficult it can be to read aloud using a “yoga voice” for the first time ever. It was great practice, though! I was 36 weeks pregnant at the time, so it was super relaxing to be the guinea pig for some of those – I felt like I was getting pampered at the spa!

Tell us a little about your students. How do you believe childbirth education is having a positive impact on them? 

I feel like my students are benefiting so much just from hearing about all the choices they will be making for in preparation for their births. My students almost always leave with a list of questions for their care provider that they would have otherwise never known to ask . I truly feel that it’s also helping the dads be able to connect with the pregnancy on a more meaningful level. As the series progresses, I notice dads becoming more confident in their ability to make joint birth decisions,  and also more confident in their ability to be a good support to their wife on the day of baby’s arrival. Seeing the friendships develop between the couples is great too.

To close, tell us how you see natural childbirth education having a positive impact? Why does this work matter to you?
Specifically in my community, where we have a 37% cesarean rate, I am hopeful that my empowered students will go out into the community and share the impact that education had on their births. I really feel this will lead to more and more couples investing in their births and having more positive experiences. Also, when we as women are educated, we can hold our doctors accountable and at a higher standard. This is the first step in lowering the astronomical cesarean rate in the Big Country.

Where can we find you?
A few different places, actually! Come visit me. I LOVE communicating with moms and dads who are interested in birth!
rockyournaturalbirth

Rock Your Natural Birth…at the Hospital! – Guest Post By Lauren Rauseo

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Today we have a guest post from Lauren Rauseo. A mother of three and author of the recently published book, “Natural Birth for the Mainstream Mama,” we are excited to share her thoughts on some basic things that can help you have an amazing natural birth in a hospital. Her book just happens to mention us as a possible childbirth education option and we couldn’t be more pleased! As you can see, she gives some great advice for getting the birth you want in the hospital, and she manages to do it in a funny, approachable and readable manner. Check out a review of Lauren’s book here and find it on Amazon.

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So you are planning a natural birth. You imagine dimmed lighting and quiet music as you labor, and a peaceful entrance for your baby. The thought of monitors, drugs and a doctor shouting, “Push!” at your va-jay-jay gives you the heebie-jeebies. Maybe you don’t see yourself popping this kid out on your living room sofa, but you long for a more home-like experience.

While the hospital offers comfort that you’re in the right place in the event of an emergency, it also brings a few challenges when preparing for an intervention-free birth. Follow these five tips so that you achieve your goal to go au naturale at the hospital.

1. Choose your hospital and care provider wisely.

This is, hands-down, the most important piece of advice you’ll get. Even if you’ve been with your OB/GYN since you got your first period, you need to interview him like you two just met. What is his C-section rate? What were the reasons for his last 10 surgical births? And since you never know who will be on call on the big day, are the other providers in the practice aligned philosophically? Don’t forget to find out what the hospital policies are as well. How long can your water be broken before the baby needs to be born? Are you allowed freedom of movement during labor? Are different positions encouraged for pushing? What are the monitoring requirements for a low-risk delivery?

Listen to not only what he is saying, but also how he is saying it. If your hunch is that he is not supportive of natural birth, then he probably isn’t. Even if your due date is close, it’s never too late to find a care provider that’s more in line with your birth plan. Consider switching to a midwife. Her expertise lies in trusting a woman’s body to do what it was physiologically designed to do, and not looking for crisis at every turn (but don’t worry; she can recognize warning signs when there is something that requires attention).

If your care provider truly believes in your body’s ability, your natural birth has a much better chance of happening. Your job is to find that care provider.

2. Assemble a supportive team.

Now that you have the right medical crew lined up, you can rest assured that you wont be offered interventions during your birth unless it’s absolutely necessary. (Half the battle has been won already!) But that doesn’t mean you won’t be asking for an epidural yourself when you’ve been in labor for 24 hours and you’re only 4 centimeters dilated.

That’s why you need your birth peeps cheering you on! First, make sure your partner in life is on board with all this natural jazz from the get-go. You both need to see eye-to-eye on your goals, and he’ll need to stand strong as your advocate that day.

But maybe even more important will be your doula, or labor coach. She’s a non-medical birth professional who actually knows what she’s doing and how to be helpful to you in your time of need. She’s seen a lot of these natural births go down, so she’ll know when it’s time to go to the hospital, how much counter pressure to apply to your hips, and why getting on all fours may help baby into a better position.

3. Make a commitment.

Have you ever said you’re going to decide whether you’ll get up early to exercise when your alarm goes off? How often does that strategy work? I’m guessing never. You must commit to your decision and eliminate the option to hit snooze. Likewise, when someone asks you if you’re going to have a natural birth, your answer should be simply, “Yes.” If yours is, “Well, I’m going to see how it goes,” then you have commitment work to do. You need to walk into this adventure with 100 percent confidence that you will do it.

Repeat after me. “My body was made to birth this baby. It will be hard, but I trust this process. I am about to have the best day ever!”

4. Retrain your brain.

Maybe you’re afraid of committing to this because you are terrified of birth! This isn’t surprising. You’ve been trained to be afraid of this event your entire life. How many times have you heard, “Childbirth is awesome! You’re going to love it!”? Zero. Mostly, you’ve been listening to women regale horror stories, and you’ve been watching ridiculous TV that exaggerates the risks and hyperbolizes the pain of childbirth in the name of ratings. You need to stop all that crap. Immediately.

Instead, surround yourself with women who have positive birth stories to share. There are plenty out there! Common themes will include a supportive midwife, an inspirational doula, lots of movement, infrequent (or no) cervical checks, intermittent monitoring, mother-led pushing, immediate skin-to-skin with baby, and overall, an environment where the mother’s voice was heard and respected.

Go places where there are others who are also preparing themselves for an empowering birth. Try a natural-focused childbirth class, and stay away from hospital-based classes, as those will likely center on risks and interventions. Read natural birth blogs and follow them on social media for constant bursts of inspiration. Once you’re in the right frame of mind, it’s easy to commit to your goal. Don’t fear for this birth; get excited for it!

5. Be patient and relax.

Patience begins while you’re still pregnant. Perhaps 41 weeks pregnant. Remember, your baby knows when to be born. Once labor does begin, trust me, you’ll be glad you refined this skill. Your doula will use comfort measures to help you during labor. Maybe she’ll rub your back, let you squeeze her hand, or read birth affirmations aloud. But none of that will help if you’re tense and working against your contractions. In order for your cervix to open, you need to totally let go and release the tension from your body. Think savasana at the end of a yoga class times a hundred; that’s how relaxed you should be. Practice often so that you’ll be able to bring yourself into relaxation more easily on the big day.

Each contraction only lasts one minute or less, even during the hardest part. And I know you can do anything for one minute. Never think about how much longer you have to go. Just breathe into this one contraction you’re having right now.

So there you have it! Are you ready to rock this natural hospital birth? Remember, every moment of this journey is fleeting, and each minute that goes by brings you one step closer to the prize: Your baby. Come on now, you got this.

If you like what you read here, get the whole book, Natural Birth for the Mainstream Mama, in paperback or ebook. http://www.amazon.com/Natural-Birth-Mainstream-Mama-practical-ebook/dp/B00I3448X0


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Lauren Rauseo is a work-from-home mom to Dylan, Liv and Fiona. Her favorite things are going for walks with the kids to collect “treasures” and singing in the car, and she isn’t afraid to admit that Starbucks, manicures, wine and yoga make the list too. Now that she’s done birthing her own brood, she has moved on to sharing her enthusiasm for natural birth with others through her book, “Natural Birth for the Mainstream Mama: A practical guide to achieving a drug-free birth in a hospital setting”, available on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Natural-Birth-Mainstream-Mama-practical/dp/1494415321). You can follow Lauren at www.facebook.com/MainstreamMama.

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