4 Simple Ways to Prepare for Natural Birth

Congratulations on your pregnancy!  Many women desire a natural birth but preparing for one can seem overwhelming.  Here are some wonderful tips for preparing yourself for the best natural birth possible.  There is so much you can do to ready yourself and your family for birth.  With these four simple things: education, nutrition, birth place, and birth team, you will be more able to make your goal a reality.  

#1-Education-  Probably the most important step in preparing for natural birth is to educate yourself as much as possible.  Just as with breastfeeding, the more you know about the benefits of natural birth for you and your baby, the more motivated you will be to follow through and prepare accordingly.

Of course there is a plethora of information out there on birth.  How do you trudge through it and find the diamonds among the coal?  First, a comprehensive childbirth education program is a must.  Look for one that is longer rather than shorter.  A weekend “crash course” cannot possibly give you all the information that you need to navigate policies, stay low risk and prepare properly for the birth you want. 

Look for natural childbirth classes that cover staying low risk, nutrition and exercise, relaxation techniques, choosing a care provider and birth place, the stages of labor, preparing your partner, common policies and procedures, breastfeeding and newborn care, and possible complications and how to avoid them. 

Not only will a good birth class help prepare you, it should prepare your partner as well.  In all honesty, your partner’s preparation is tantamount.  If they are frightened or simply unaware of normality, it will inevitably impact the birth negatively. 

In addition to preparing your partner, your natural birth instructor will be able to guide you to find the best books, websites, even care providers and doulas in your area.  Think of a childbirth instructor as somebody on the “inside.”  They have been there and done that and now they can help you accomplish the same thing.  (Our instructors are well trained women who have had natural births, themselves.  You can see a list of their requirements here.)

#2-Nutrition-  As you will quickly learn, preparing your body for a natural birth is just as important as preparing your mind.  Your body will go through some drastic changes as it grows first a placenta, then a baby, adds fluid, almost doubles its blood volume and prepares for future breastfeeding. 

Eating properly means not just avoiding refined foods such as sugars, white flours, packaged foods and chemical sweeteners, it also means adding the right foods into your diet.  Daily nutrition should include several servings of greens (broccoli, spinach, kale, asparagus, etc), citrus foods (oranges, tomatoes, kiwis, bell peppers), vegetables and fruits (celery, cucumbers, bananas and apples), whole grains (spelt, quinoa, oatmeal), eggs, complete protein sources (meats or other combined proteins such as beans and rice) and dairy (milk, Greek yogurt, keifer). 

Women are amazed at how much better they feel when eating properly during pregnancy. Many common pregnancy ailments disappear. Great nutrition and adequate protein can even help eliminate morning sickness.  Your childbirth instructor can provide you with a complete system to chart your nutritional intake and make corrections, if needed.  You can also find many phone apps with which you can keep track of your daily nutrition throughout pregnancy. 

Great nutrition will help your body and your baby be ready for a natural birth.  Many care providers believe that common ailments that surface at the end of pregnancy and often lead to induction or C-section can actually be avoided with optimal nutrition.

#3-Choose Your Birth Place Carefully-   One of the most important choices, as you prepare for a natural birth, is your choice of birth place.  Many factors play into this decision from insurance coverage to proximity.  Women often have three main choices available to them when it comes to birth place:  hospital, birth center or home.  The birth place that works best for you and your family will be influenced by many things, from cost to your own health to where you feel most emotionally comfortable. 

Wherever you choose to birth, be sure that the policies are not so prohibitive that they make natural birth nearly impossible.  Some important policies to look for are:

  • Women are encouraged to eat and drink in early labor.
  • Vaginal exams are kept to a minimum.
  • Women are encouraged to move about in labor.
  • IV’s are only given when necessary.
  • Breastfeeding is supported.
  • They have a low C-section rate. 

In a birth center, you may want a hospital nearby in case of transfer and an environment in which you feel comfortable and supported.  If choosing a home birth (as with any other birth place), you will want to carefully choose your midwife. Look specifically for someone with experience, skills or certification that you feel comfortable with. 

While it may be tempting to choose a birth place simply because it is close, doing things because they seem “easy” is an often regretted decision for birthing women.  A nearby hospital with a sky high induction and C-section rate will greatly increase your chances for the same.  In the case of an unwanted and/or unneeded cesarean section, a shorter drive for a birth place can yield a much longer recovery.  Choose your birth place carefully. 

#4-Choose Your Team Well-  You won’t win the Super Bowl with a football team made up of expert karaoke singers and you won’t get a natural birth with a team of care providers who specialize in surgical birth.  Choosing your birth team carefully is one of the best ways to ensure you get a natural birth.  Sometimes, even when a mother is knowledgeable and physically prepared, things can fall apart for her in labor if her team doesn’t support her decisions. 

So how do you find this pro-natural birth team of supporters?  Asking your childbirth instructor is a great way to start.  As a woman experienced in birth and engaged in the local birth community, she should have a list of resources to provide you with. 

There are many people who will make up your birth team. All of these people will influence your birth experience.

A great doula (a woman trained to support a birthing mother) can be a fabulous resource for both the laboring woman and her partner.  She can provide emotional and physical support, an experts view on supportive care providers, and may act as a sounding board for advice. 

Another good person to have on your team is a Webster Certified chiropractor.  Chiropractic care during pregnancy (and even birth) can help ensure the pelvis is well aligned so that it can move for a faster and more comfortable birthing experience with a better positioned baby.  This alone can help avoid many problems that prevent natural birth. 

Probably most important of all is your choice of care provider.  Your doctor or midwife will make decisions when you can’t and will be there for the final moments of birth.  It is vitally important that this person be both trustworthy and skilled.  If you are a low risk woman, you may want to consider midwifery care.  Midwives often work in hospitals (thought many can be found working in a home birth or birth center environment) and their approach to birth tends to be more supportive of  natural choices. 

You CAN Have an Amazing Birth!  Choosing a natural birth is a wonderful decision. With the right choices and preparation, we believe that most women can achieve this goal.  (Check out our stats from our students!)  Proper education, excellent nutrition, and careful choice of your birth team and your birth place are all things that can make your choice of a natural birth more attainable.  When all is said and done, sometimes things don’t go exactly as planned.  But, when we have done our best and chosen a care provider that we trust, we can rest assured that we did everything possible to accomplish our goal.

I’m pregnant! What’s happening here?

Photo credit: super-structure / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

What Should I Expect During the First Trimester of Pregnancy?

You are pregnant!  Congratulations!

Now you might be wondering, what happens next?  If this is your first baby then you are in for some wonderful and amazing changes as your body starts to grow a new human being.  Every moment might not be wonderful, but every change does inspire wonder.

Here is a list of some of the many changes that take place in your body during the first trimester of pregnancy.  The symptoms you experience will vary, since every woman and every pregnancy are different. Consult your care provider with any questions you may have.

Nausea or Morning Sickness-

Morning sickness is probably the most talked about pregnancy symptom of all.  For many women there are symptoms of nausea that start somewhere around five or six weeks into pregnancy.  The length of time this lasts varies, from a few weeks to the entire pregnancy.  Typically, nausea subsides after the first trimester, or around 12 weeks gestation.  While it is called “morning sickness”, this pregnancy nausea can last all day, but is often worse in the morning or after going without food for a long stretch.  For some women, they will experience no nausea whatsoever.

Morning sickness is thought to be caused by changing hormones and the slowing down of digestion that often occurs during pregnancy.  Various things can help control pregnancy nausea so that it isn’t overwhelming.  Eating protein rich foods frequently throughout the day is often the most helpful thing that can be done.  Trying to consume about 80 grams of protein each day may provide relief, and starting each morning with a protein rich breakfast (eggs, oatmeal with fruit and nuts) can start the day off right and curb nausea.

Ginger is well known for it’s ability to help with nausea and can usually be safely consumed during pregnancy.

Breast tenderness-

While not as talked about as nausea, breast tenderness is often the first thing that tells a woman that she may be pregnant.  Suddenly your breasts are tender to the touch, which may be especially noticeable while exercising.  Usually a minor irritant, breast tenderness is one of the first signs that your body is growing a baby, your hormones are changing, and you will in a few short months be nursing your little one!  Our bodies are amazing.

There is no known “cure” for this aspect of pregnancy and it will usually pass with time.

Headaches-

Some women experience headaches during pregnancy, often in the first trimester.  While they can be disconcerting, especially to someone not used to them, there is often a simple solution.  Often pregnancy headaches are simply caused by low blood sugar and the increased need for nourishment as the placenta is being formed.  Pregnancy is not a pathology, but it is hard work for the body and requires healthy, whole foods, frequently throughout the day.  (Sign up for our e-mail list to get a FREE download about optimal pregnancy nutrition with bonus recipes.)

Eating frequent small snacks or meals (about every two hours) always containing a protein source is probably the best way to not only curb pregnancy headaches and also feed your body the nourishment it so needs during the early days of pregnancy.  The practice of eating healthy has the added bonus of helping with a variety of pregnancy symptoms considered unavoidable, from nausea to swelling.  You and your baby are worth the effort.

Feeling emotional-

Though seldom talked about, feeling a variety of strong emotions during pregnancy (especially during the first trimester) is very common.  Some women find they cry more easily, others find that they are glowing and deliriously happy.  Even when a pregnancy was planned and much looked forward to, feelings of ambivalence are normal.  The occurrence is so common it is documented in midwifery textbooks as a normal pregnancy symptom.

While the change in hormones may cause this emotional manifestation of the physical changes in the body, there are things that can help.  Some women find that careful attention to their diet, paying especial attention to healthy B vitamin sources is beneficial.  Brewers yeast, seafood (in moderation, according to your care provider’s recommendations), beef, cheese and eggs are all ways to increase B vitamin consumption through diet.

It is also important that the new mother be gentle with herself, accept that pregnancy can be emotional, and surround herself with supportive people like her partner, her birth doula, family and friends, and a knowledgeable childbirth educator.  Pregnancy is a time where each women deserves extra care and support.

Exhaustion-

You are pregnant!  Do you feel sleepy yet?!

It is very common for pregnant women to feel tired in both the first and the third trimester.  During the first trimester of pregnancy (from conception to about 12 weeks gestation) it is perfectly normal to be tired.  Your body is working hard to form a placenta and the very beginnings of your baby.  Give your body time to rest and feed it well during this time when so much is developing.

Good diet, paying special attention to greens (you can supplement with a liquid chlorophyll if needed) and iron intake (meats are high in this and chlorophyl supplements will help your iron to absorb well as will vitamin C) can help with tiredness.   Women get a renewed energy when the second trimester starts, around 13 weeks.

Frequent urination-

Even though the baby is very tiny during the first trimester, it is not uncommon to have a frequent urge to urinate. Hormonal changes cause the blood to flow through your kidneys more quickly thus causing more frequent urination.  In addition, your blood volume increases dramatically during pregnancy (by about 50%) and this is a further stress on the kidneys and increases the need to urinate.  Of course, as the baby grows, because it rests just above the bladder, the increased weight adds pressure causing frequent urges.

Though this is a normal and healthy part of pregnancy, avoiding things that are diuretic (like coffee, tea, caffeine, and alcohol) can ease the burden on your hard working body.

Birth Boot Camp encourages a proper Kegel program to strengthen the pelvic floor.  The muscles in the pelvic floor support the bladder and other organs and having them strong and flexible allows for more control of elimination.

Growing a human is hard work - 

Sometimes it is tempting to focus on the “symptoms” of pregnancy.  We prefer however to focus on what a miracle it is.  A human being (you) is able to grow another human being.  It is truly amazing (and yes, hard) work.  You will find that there are many nutritional and lifestyle changes that can improve overall health and happiness throughout pregnancy.

Enjoy!  The best is yet to come.

Should You Kegel?

 

Introduced in 1948 to strengthen the pelvic floor, Kegel exercises have recently experienced a surge of controversy. The discussion on how and when Kegels (an exercise designed to improve core strength and support the internal organs) are appropriate for women requires examining how the pelvic floor functions and what keeps it in shape.

This article discusses the function of the pelvic floor, how to properly incorporate Kegels into your lifestyle and alternatives if Kegels are inappropriate for you.

The function and purpose of the pelvic floor.

The pelvic floor consists of a group of muscles that sit between your pubic bone in front and your coccyx, tailbone, in the back.  Ideally, the pelvic floor acts like a trampoline – flexible to weight when needed, but strong enough to hold up what is placed on it.  The pelvic floor has four main functions:

  1. It acts as a sphincter, which means it closes the openings of the urethra and the vagina.
  2. It is supportive. In particular, it supports the pelvic organs (uterus, bladder, etc.).
  3. It has a sexual function.  An orgasm is a rhythmic contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.
  4. It is a stabilizer.  The muscles of the pelvic floor stabilize the pelvis during movement.  When functioning properly, the pelvic floor can help prevent or decrease pain in the low back, pelvic region, hip, and even the knees.  Think of the pelvis as the foundation of a house and your spine as the house.  If the foundation is weak, then the house won’t stand properly.  Your pelvic strength is important to your spinal health and thus the health of the entire body.

The pelvic floor muscles do not exist alone.  They work together with your transverse abdominals and multifidus (deep back) muscles to support your pelvis and spine.  Your glutes are also very important to the stability of your body- specifically your gluteus medius.

In addition to the everyday necessity of a strong pelvic floor for prevention of problems like urine leakage, a strong pelvic floor is specifically important during pregnancy and childbirth.  Most every pregnant woman has noticed increased pressure and, sometimes, trouble with leaking urine as the baby gets bigger and presses down more and more on the bladder.  A strong pelvic floor can help with this and is important to proper positioning of the baby at the time of birth.

The ideal position for a baby to be born is with the face towards the mother’s tailbone with the chin tucked to the chest.  This ensures that the smallest presenting part (that “cone head” sometimes noticeable in the hours after birth) is presenting.  A strong pelvic floor applies appropriate pressure to the top of the baby’s head, causing the chin to tuck and encouraging this birthing position for the baby.  A face or military presentation (where the face of the baby is the presenting part) is much bigger, can cause more pain, and can, in fact, be impossible to deliver vaginally.

A properly functioning pelvic floor will help prevent embarrassment, discomfort, and even difficult labors.

What are Kegels? 

Arnold Kegel was a gynecologist in the 1940s who worked with women suffering from “genital relaxation” or a weak pelvic floor.  He used an instrument that could measure the strength of the pelvic floor muscles to determine the severity of the condition.  Dr. Kegel saw women of all ages who struggled with various problems (incontinence, sexual dysfunction, etc.) due to a weak pelvic floor.  His intention was to find a way to help people who struggled with urinary incontinence without resorting to surgery.  (You can read Arnold Kegel’s published paper on the pelvic floor here.)  He sought to help women learn to identify and strengthen the pelvic floor through resistance exercise, ie, muscle contraction.  His findings indicated that in all but the most severe cases of pelvic floor damage, women could return to a normal, functional lifestyle through these exercises.  The strengthening of the pelvic floor muscles, pioneered by Dr. Arnold Kegel, are known today as Kegel exercises.

Researchers are still finding great benefits to women who are doing proper pelvic floor exercises.  Today, rather than using the instrument used by Dr Kegel, physical therapists and others specializing in female pelvic floor health use biofeedback machines to measure the strength of the pelvic floor and to help women learn how to properly contract and relax these muscles.

Proper Kegeling

While Kegel exercises for the pelvic floor are currently very accepted and widely done, it is apparent that just doing Kegels, without proper instruction, is simply not enough.  A Kegel exercise program should be done properly and should be individually geared for each woman and her needs.  The Kegel program taught in Birth Boot Camp classes is based on the work of Pamela Jones, PT.  This individualized program helps each woman assess her pelvic floor needs and adjust her exercise program.

It is important that women struggling with severe or specific problems or pelvic pain consult with their care provider or seek out a physical therapist specializing in women’s health.  The following are general tips for properly strengthening the pelvic floor.

A proper Kegel requires FULL relaxation and then FULL contraction and then back to FULL relaxation.  Remember, proper Kegels don’t just involve contractions.  Relaxation is a very important component to your pelvic floor health.  If a woman cannot achieve full pelvic floor relaxation then stretching and relaxation techniques should be used first.

To begin Kegeling, you must first recognize the muscle that you will be strengthening.  This is often done by stopping the flow of urine mid-stream.  The muscle that you tighten in order to do this will be the same one you strengthen doing Kegels.  (Don’t do this frequently, only to initially identify the correct muscle.)  Noting how easy this is for you and how quickly it can be done can give you some indication of your pelvic floor strength.  Another way to identify strength of the pelvic floor is by tightening your pelvic floor during intercourse and getting feedback from your partner.  Note how long you can hold this contraction and how many times you can repeat it.  As you begin a pelvic floor strengthening program, continually ask for feedback from your partner.

Once your pelvic floor strength has been determined, you can tailor your Kegel program to fit your needs.  A weaker pelvic floor will require just three to five repetitions five times per day in a position where gravity can assist you.  For example, with your hips propped up with pillows.  A woman with a stronger pelvic floor will be able to Kegel in an upright position, even while walking or running and will be capable of doing more contractions.

Remember to tighten and then FULLY relax the muscle.  A proper Kegel will develop both strength and awareness of the muscle.  We don’t just want a “tight” pelvic floor; we want a strong pelvic floor which we are able to fully relax.  Also, be aware of the surrounding muscles.  The point of a Kegel is not to tighten the gluts or bottom.  Those should stay relaxed.  Focus on muscles in the front.  It will feel like you are tightening the vaginal opening rather than the rectum.

No more Kegels?

It seems clear that the scientific literature and popular opinion recognize the importance of both the strength of the pelvic floor and the importance of Kegels in this strength.  Despite this, Kegels have fallen out of favor in some circles and this sentiment has made its way into the birthing world.

Often those who believe Kegels should not be done recommend squatting instead.  Any comprehensive birthing class will encourage and focus on squats.  They are a very important exercise for many reasons – flexibility, strength, and opening up the pelvic outlet.  They are also effective in strengthening the pelvic floor without the use of Kegels.  Our instructors encourage their students to appropriately squat AND Kegel as part of their comprehensive physical preparation for childbirth.  Many other exercises are also encouraged which help strengthen the body for birth.  Ideally, these two exercises (squats and Kegels) will both be employed by women for a fully functional, flexible, and strong pelvic floor.

Is there a time when Kegels are not appropriate?  Some women will find that their pelvic floor is excessively tight.  Tight is different than strong.  In fact, a woman can have a weak pelvic floor that is very tight.  This is usually accompanied by pelvic floor pain.  Women describe this pain as feeling like a headache in the pelvis.  For those women whose pelvic floor is very tight, doing excessive Kegels would not be appropriate and could make the problem worse.  Diagnosis and treatment from a physical therapist specializing in pelvic floor problems may be appropriate.  Your physical therapist would be able to prescribe an individualized program that could help.

In addition to exercise, we recommend that pregnant women seek chiropractic care from a Webster certified chiropractor.  Chiropractic care during pregnancy can also help with some of the pain associated with pregnancy and, like a strong pelvic floor, can help ensure proper positioning of the baby.  As mentioned earlier, the pelvic floor, spine and pelvis all work together for a functioning, healthy, and pain free body.  If the pelvis is badly misaligned causing torque on the pelvic floor muscles and thus excessive tightness and an inability to fully relax, it can not only cause pain but make it nearly impossible to properly Kegel and strengthen the pelvic floor muscles.  A chiropractic adjustment by a Webster certified chiropractor can remove the misalignment in the pelvic bones allowing full relaxation of the pelvic floor and relieving pain.  Once the bones are properly positioned and the muscles are allowed to fully relax, a complete Kegel exercise program may be implemented to strengthen the muscles that were once weak and hypertonic (tight), allowing it to be both supple and strong.

In conclusion

Without a doubt, a strong and healthy pelvic floor is important to every pregnant woman.  A comprehensive childbirth class should include various ways to strengthen the pelvic floor, including Kegels, squats, and other core strengthening exercises.  It is important for women to evaluate their own individual needs and adapt, as necessary.  Your childbirth educator will also go over many of the ways you can protect both the pelvic floor and the perineum (tissues between the rectum and the vagina) during birth.

Additional information and resources-

Dr Kegel’s Research:
http://journals.lww.com/greenjournal/Citation/1956/11000/Early_Genital_Relaxation__New_technic_of_diagnosis.4.aspx
 
Study finds Kegel exercises more effective than cone or electric treatment:
http://www.bmj.com/content/318/7182/487.abstract
 
Cochrane Library meta analysis finds that doing Kegel exercises improves lifestyle and in particular, stress incontinence:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD005654.pub2/abstract;jsessionid=ECFB884EB2A0D1D252E134351F9B8AA4.d03t01
 
Website for Pamela Jones, Physical Therapist specializing in women’s issues:
http://physicaltherapy-northtexas.com/
 
To find a chiropractor certified to work work with pregnant women, check out:
http://icpa4kids.org/Find-a-Chiropractor/
 
Thanks to Sara Bogner, Physical Therapist and Nathan Clark, DC for lending their professional opinions on this subject.
 
 
 
Sarah Clark has been a birth instructor since 2008 and now helps train future birthing instructors for Birth Boot Camp.  A mother of four, she also blogs about natural birth and motherhood at www.mamabirthblog.com.

Happy World Doula Week!

 

You CAN have an amazing birth!

 Register today for your live or online birth class.

Join our team as a natural childbirth instructor. Apply today!

 

Happy Birthday!

What an amazing year it has been! Birth Boot Camp launched one year ago in March 2012. This has been a year of learning and growth. We are so happy to have had the opportunity to serve so many couples through our live and online birth classes.

Our natural childbirth instructors, along with their students, are thrilled with the comprehensive education they are receiving!

“Just wanted to say that my husband and I are LOVING our Birth Boot Camp classes! Our instructor is so knowledgeable and passionate about the material and we love getting to spend time with other like- minded expecting couples! The Field Guide is STUFFED with priceless information. Today will be our third class and I already feel more prepared for this birth than I ever did for my first! Thank you!!” – Rachel

 

 

 

The epidural rate in the USA is estimated by the CDC to be around 61% for women who delivered vaginally.¹  The medicated rate for Birth Boot Camp moms who delivered vaginally was only 9%.

The national C-section rate is around 32% while the Birth Boot Camp student rate is a combined (live and online class) rate of 9%.²  Truly, education does make a difference when it comes to birth.

Our online birth classes have been accessed by over 100 couples around the world. are available to couples around the world.

 

We have been honored to welcome 30 Birth Boot Camp instructors across 7 states to our team this past year. Looking forward, as of October 2013, we will have instructors in over 20 states and 3 countries!

Whether you choose to take Birth Boot Camp from one of our instructors in a live class setting or through our online birth classes, you will be trained in natural birth and breastfeeding through an accessible, comprehensive and contemporary curriculum.

Birth Boot Camp is for couples, moms AND dads. You’ll learn to work together to bring your baby into this world as a team.

Birth Boot Camp is a 10-class course. In addition to a comprehensive and modern class designed for parents planning a natural childbirth, all students will receive the full color, professionally printed Field Manual, relaxation training, links to additional reading on complimentary topics, and an exclusive breastfeeding DVD, The Ultimate MRE, taught by renowned lactation consultant, Mellanie Sheppard, ICBLC, RLC

You CAN have an amazing birth!

 Register today for your live or online birth class.

Join our team as a natural childbirth instructor! Apply today!

 

¹ http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr59/nvsr59_05.pdf

² http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db35.htm

Voted #1 Childbirth Class!

Birth Boot Camp® is honored this year to be voted “Best Childbirth Class” by the Fort Worth Child Magazine. We are so excited about the overwhelmingly positive response we have had to our natural birth classes (both live and online).  We look forward to many more years of teaching couples that they CAN have an amazing birth!

Check out the list in the 2013 DFW Child found here!

Check out our online classes, find an instructor in your area, or train to become a Birth Boot Camp Instructor yourself!

 

What Does Labor Feel Like?

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What does labor feel like?  This is a question that almost every soon-to-be mother asks.  It fills us with trepidation, excitement, and even fear.  So what DOES labor feel like?

The answer is a little different to everybody because, of course, labor is as individual as the women who experience it.  To begin deepening our understanding of labor, let’s talk about the basic stages of labor as defined by medical professionals, generally, and then describe common ways women describe the “feel” of each part of labor.

Labor can be broken down into these parts:

Pre-labor, Early labor (first stage), Active labor, Transition, Pushing (second stage), and Delivery of the placenta (third stage).

Pre-labor-

Pre-labor is often called “braxton-hicks” and can begin early on in pregnancy, sometimes as early as 20 weeks.  Women often begin feeling braxton-hicks earlier in their pregnancy the more babies they have.    Named for the man who first described them, an English doctor named John Braxton Hicks, they have been talked about for hundreds of years.

Some people like to think of pre-labor contractions as a practice for labor.  While they are usually spotty, irregular, painless, and don’t cause dilation of the cervix, pre-labor contractions may serve to “warm up” the uterus and help prepare the baby and body for labor.

For most women, braxton-hicks feel (usually) painless, cannot be regularly timed like serious labor contractions, and may stop and start.  These pre-labor contractions can be brought on by excessive activity, lack of food or water, and even stress.  Unlike true labor contractions, pre-labor contractions are often felt in “spots” rather than over the entire uterus.  The sensation is different for each woman and can feel like simple baby movement or even gas.

Early labor-

Early labor is aptly named and just defines the part of labor that is early, or the beginning.  Unlike pre-labor contractions, early labor contractions are regular, will not stop with eating, drinking water, or rest.  Early labor contractions will be regular but not close together.  If timed, they usually last less than a minute and are not intense, though they are noticeable.  Early labor contractions can feel like tightening or rhythmic menstrual cramping.

Often women are excited to experience these regular and consistent early labor contractions because it means that they are really “in labor” and will be meeting their baby soon.  With longer breaks between them (often 5 to 20 minutes apart or more), early labor contractions are not typically overwhelming but are a signal to the woman and her partner to start preparing for the work that comes ahead as labor progresses.

The beginning of labor signifies what is medically known as “first stage labor”.

Active labor-

As these contractions become more regular, stronger, longer and closer together, a woman will enter what is known as active labor.  The majority of labor is, most often, experienced here.  Dilation is happening as the cervix opens and shortens and the baby may start to move down.

What does active labor feel like?  This part of labor feels more serious and like the “work” that labor is named for.  At times, there are feelings of pressure as the baby turns and moves downwards putting more pressure on the cervix.  Women will feel these active labor contractions closer together, often about five minutes apart and lasting about a minute or so long.

Contractions are stronger, longer, and closer together.  They may feel like rhythmic cramping, intense pain in the low back, or even warm shooting sensations down the legs.  Some women feel contractions over their whole stomach area, while others feel them very low, where the cervix is opening.  The work of the uterus in labor is to pull that cervix back, so that the baby can come down and out.

Still, there are breaks between the contractions and a chance to catch your breath, relax, eat, and enjoy the journey of labor.  This certainly is hard work and, to some, may feel a little overwhelming.  Active labor requires support, a wonderful birthing environment and knowledge of what is going on so that the sensations and intensity of contractions do not take a woman by surprise.

Transition-

Transition is the part of labor that people often fear.  This intense part of labor happens right before the pushing phase and can be a time of rapid dilation.  Not all women will notice an overwhelming transitional phase of labor, but those who do certainly don’t forget it.

Transition is often the shortest part of labor, typically lasting between 15 to 30 minutes. It can feel overwhelming and what many would call “painful”.  This time of hard work will yield a reward, though!  When transition is over, pushing begins and the baby will soon arrive.

What does transition feel like?  Physically and emotionally intense to some, contractions can come right on top of one another, even double peaking.  Transition can be accompanied by vomiting, shaking and strong sensations of pressure as the baby moves into position to be born.

Often gone are the breaks between contractions.  Transition contractions leave little time in between for chatting and laughter.  Mom will be serious and focused. She will need reassurance and support.  Emotionally, she may want to give up, so this is the time when she needs the most strength and respect from those around her.  This physical and emotional sensation of surrender is vital to the birth experience and helps the mom let go of her body and open up so that the baby can descend and the cervix can open.

While sometimes feared, transition labor is usually brief and is so rewarding because when it is over baby will be here soon.

Pushing (second stage labor)-

The urge to push is often an exciting change of pace.  Pushing, like any other part of labor, can feel different for different people.

For some, pushing is painless and exciting.  The feelings of pressure can be overwhelming and impossible to fight.  Many women describe the initial pushing sensations as the “need to poop”.  The baby is big and is pressing down on the same parts of the body and triggering the same reflexes as a bowel movement would.  The urge to “go” or “poop” is a good thing and helps direct the body to effectively push.  When mom has triumphantly passed through transition labor without any medication, she will be aware and able to feel and work with her body through this important and physically active part of labor.

Pushing can be intense but can also be enjoyable.  Every woman experiences pushing in labor differently.  Pushing contractions often space out with five or so minutes between them, giving mom a longer break to recover.  She may, once again, be excited and able chat and talk with those around her.    Upright positions will speed and encourage this process.

Part of the second stage or pushing part of labor is crowning.  Some women notice a sensation called a “ring of fire” during crowning.  This feeling is usually very short and is caused by the tissues of the vagina stretching tightly over the head of the baby.  The “burn” that some women notice can be temporarily painful but is an important thing to feel.  This “ring of fire” helps mom back off of pushing during the time of crowning.  This pause gives the tissues time to gently stretch over the baby’s head, helping her vaginal tissues not tear.  Another benefit of an unmedicated birth is that mom can feel this burning sensation and listen to her body accordingly, helping prevent excessive vaginal tearing.

The delivery of the placenta (third stage of labor)-

The last stage of labor is the delivery of the placenta.  Many women barely notice this part of labor.

Breastfeeding can help the uterus contract after the delivery of the baby and cause “after-pains” or mild contractions that help the uterus clamp down and help the placenta deliver.  Often care providers will just tell a woman to “cough” as they gently tug on the cord AFTER the placenta has detached.  The placenta is soft and usually comes out easily, with little or no pain.  Once the placenta detaches and is sitting in the uterus it can feel heavy and delivering it will feel like a relief.

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When it comes down to it, each labor and each woman is unique.  We all experience labor in our own way and would describe it differently.  Think of the labor of each baby as a unique journey and gift to help bring it into the world rather than something to be avoided.  Certainly the sensations and even pain of labor serve a purpose, as they tell us what to do and when to do it.  The feelings of labor are not useless, rather they teach us how to move and more efficiently birth our baby.

 

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Top 10 Foods to Stock for Postpartum

One day you are pregnant, and the next day a mother! One of the most important things a new mom can have is a fridge and pantry stocked with healthy, easy to grab foods for those first few weeks.

Nursing a baby frequently, recovering from the work of labor and birth, while adjusting to a new sleep schedule all require optimal nutrition and frequent healthy snacks. Here are our top ten ideas for great, easy snacks when you are caring for a new baby.

1) Yogurt- Yogurt in serving size cups is full of protein and easy to grab and eat one handed while nursing.

2) Cheese sticks- Buy a big pack of cheese sticks and keep them in the fridge. You can grab one with a handful of whole wheat crackers to munch on the go. With seven grams of protein per serving they are a great snack.  If you have older kids, they will love them too.

3) Cherry tomatoes- Cherry tomatoes are sweet without being junk food and an easy way to get some vitamin C rich foods when you need a quick snack.

4) Berries- Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, etc. are easy to grab and full of nutrients and anti-oxidants that your body needs when healing post-baby. Throw them in your yogurt to add some flavor.

5) Granola- Granola is packed with protein, carbs, fat and energy. Easy to eat with some milk or yogurt or even by itself.  It is easy to grab and eat on the go or while you sit and nurse.

6) Nuts- Stock up on different nuts at your local health food store. Keep them on hand and you will always have some yummy energy food when you get a moment. Try raw nuts to avoid too much salt or sugar.

7) Clementines- Small, sweet, and full of vitamins, these easy-to-peel orange are a great snack for both mom and older kids. And the children won’t need your help to get them ready, so they can feed themselves.

8) Bananas- Bananas are a power food for the whole family. Full of potassium, easy to grab on the go and great for adding to other foods. You have got to keep bananas on hand.

9) Edamame- Fresh shelled soybeans are so good with a little sea salt and can be eaten alone or added to salad. Even kids will love them!

10) Hummus and pita chips- Easy to dip, healthy grains and protein packed hummus makes this a perfect snack for a nursing mama.

Take care of yourself postpartum and you will have more energy to devote to your baby. Easy snacks for the new mama make the transition to a bigger family so much easier.